Hivos International

Open and Responsive Government

A new generation of strategies for government accountability is needed, one that fully considers entrenched, institutional obstacles to change. Vertical integration of coordinated civil society policy monitoring and advocacy is one such strategy. Engaging each stage and level of public sector actions in an integrated way can locate the causes of accountability failures, show their interconnected nature, and leverage the local, national and transnational power shifts necessary to produce sustainable institutional change.

A new generation of strategies for government accountability is needed, one that fully considers entrenched, institutional obstacles to change. Vertical integration of coordinated civil society policy monitoring and advocacy is one such strategy. Engaging each stage and level of public sector actions in an integrated way can locate the causes of accountability failures, show their interconnected nature, and leverage the local, national and transnational power shifts necessary to produce sustainable institutional change.

A new generation of strategies for government accountability is needed, one that fully considers entrenched, institutional obstacles to change. Vertical integration of coordinated civil society policy monitoring and advocacy is one such strategy. Engaging each stage and level of public sector actions in an integrated way can locate the causes of accountability failures, show their interconnected nature, and leverage the local, national and transnational power shifts necessary to produce sustainable institutional change.

In citizen-led accountability initiatives, we understand much more about how citizens mobilise around accountability demands than we do about what leads state agents to respond to them. This report highlights some key themes that are important in exploring the state side of the accountability equation.

The insights shared here emerged from a workshop which brought together researchers, policy specialists and practitioners working in the field of accountable governance.

The questions they asked included:

Open data is often an integral part of promoting transparency, fighting corruption and harnessing new technologies to strengthen governance. But to implement ‘good’ open data, government departments must coordinate to share data that is intersectoral, linked, in standard open formats, and – most importantly – is relevant and current.

Developing innovative solutions for accountable governance – with or without a tech focus – involves trying out new ideas and learning from the process. Throughout our support to innovations and technologies that have the potential to transform governance, and our efforts to build an evidence base on how they work, Making All Voices Count is committed to learning systematically from our experiences, sharing our reflections beyond the programme, and improving our practice.

This research report explains how Tearfund set out to learn from and enhance its advocacy programme in Uganda. It carried out research in 18 communities in the Teso region of east Uganda, where the CCM advocacy process was being implemented by a partner church.

The research provides valuable insights into the strengths and weaknesses of conducting local-level advocacy through churches.

Much of the literature on citizen accountability focuses on citizen voices. This research briefing is one of four which turn the spotlight on the how the state behaves in instances of accountable governance. Each examines a landmark social justice policy process in Africa, asking when and how the state listened, and to which actors; and why, at times, it chose not to listen.

Much of the literature on citizen accountability focuses on citizen voices. This research briefing is one of four which turn the spotlight on the how the state behaves in instances of accountable governance. Each examines a landmark social justice policy process in Africa, asking when and how the state listened, and to which actors; and why, at times, it chose not to listen.

Much of the literature on citizen accountability focuses on citizen voices. This research briefing is one of four which turn the spotlight on the how the state behaves in instances of accountable governance. Each examines a landmark social justice policy process in Africa, asking when and how the state listened, and to which actors; and why, at times, it chose not to listen.

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