Hivos International

Digital Activism

Citizen action and the perverse confluence of opposing agendas

Are people organizing against injustice in ways that differ fundamentally from those of recent decades? And, today's uprisings and mobilizations compared to their predecessors, do you find more continuity than difference? These and other question on contemporary citizen action and the Occupy movement are addressed by Lisa Veneklasen in her highly interesting article onopendemocracy.net. Here you will find a short introduction of her article.

Hivos and The Centre for Internet and Society consolidate their 3 year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth,  technology and change in the 4 book collective "Digital AlterNatives  with a cause?". This collaboratively produced collective asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world.

Hivos and The Centre for Internet and Society consolidate their 3 year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth,  technology and change in the 4 book collective "Digital AlterNatives  with a cause?". This collaboratively produced collective asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world.

Hivos and The Centre for Internet and Society consolidate their 3 year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth,  technology and change in the 4 book collective "Digital AlterNatives  with a cause?". This collaboratively produced collective asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world.

Hivos and The Centre for Internet and Society consolidate their 3 year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth,  technology and change in the 4 book collective "Digital AlterNatives  with a cause?". This collaboratively produced collective asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world.

This new publication shows that young people are sensitive and thoughtful and more then willing to contribute to change in their societies. It proves that the common complaint that young people are not interested in politics, is mainly a result of insufficient understanding of the world of youngsters. Digital Natives - youths thriving on digital technologies - are sensitive and thoughtful; it is time to listen to them.

Digital Natives from Asia and Africa have provided us with their take on social change and political participation. They look at issues such as: what does it mean to be a Digital Native? What is the relationship of people growing up with new technologies and change? What are the processes by which change is produced? Can you institutionalize Digital Natives with a Cause Activities? How do you make it sustainable in each context?

Western companies turn a healthy profit by exporting their surveillance technologies and equipment to repressive regimes. This is what Ben Wagner concludes in the Hivos-commissioned report “Exporting Censorship and Surveillance Technology”. Wagner interviewed dozens of people from Europe and North Africa and found that governments there have relied heavily on Western censorship technologies in an attempt to quell the civil unrest during the Arab Spring.

Social Media in the Arab World

On February 3rd 2011 Jeffrey Ghannam published the report: ‘Social Media in the Arab World; Leading up to the Uprising of 2011’. Ghannam decided to accelerate the production of the report on social media and free expression as it can provide a useful backdrop to the recent popular uprising in Tunisia and Egypt. It aims to give an insight into the rise of an independent and vibrant social media, its impact on the politics of the Arab world and the challenges and limitation imposed by the authoritarian governments.

Pull the Plug

Is it time to start talking about the right to disconnect? There is so much expectation and focus on being connected to the internet, that it seems like we don't have a choice. We hear a lot about how the internet should be considered as one of the basic human rights. As more of the world gets connected through the World Wide Web, and information becomes the new capital, there is a digital divide that emerges between those who can surf the web with ease, and those who struggle to boot their computers.

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