Hivos International

I know what I know (but how do I know what I don’t?)

Learning events are designed to foster trust and collaboration among participants, but they should also encourage the kind of disruptive discourse that can inspire innovation.

This report aims to capture the content of a one-day Making All Voices Count South African Community of Practice (CoP) meeting held in November 2016. The CoP has been running for three years and has met between two and four times a year. It is a space for Making All Voices Count grantees and others working to foster innovation in the fields of transparency and accountability to share experiences and knowledge and collaborate in learning and improving work. This CoP meeting was focused on improving understanding of this learning process and on contributing to setting an agenda for learning in 2017, the last year of Making All Voices Count activities.

This report is divided into five main sections:

  • the introduction summarises the framing for the event that the facilitator established, drawing on some of Making All Voices Count’s approaches to learning
  • the second and third parts – ‘What do I know?’ and ‘What don’t I know?’ – include the model that framed the workshop, and capture some of the discussions and inputs that came from using it
  • the next section – ‘How are we learning?’ – offers three case studies to explore the learning processes that three organisations have gone through, which were investigated at the meeting through interviews and discussions
  • the ‘Future learning’ section summarises the discussion that took place on how workshop outputs will be used to inform the Making All Voices Count learning agenda in South Africa in 2017.

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