Hivos International

How our means are undermining our goals: What a Hollywood movie can teach us about agriculture

If you've seen the film Speed you will remember the conundrum that Sandra Bullock and Keanu Reeves find themselves in when they discover a bomb underneath a bus. As soon as the speed of the bus drops below 50mph, the bomb will explode, so our heroes resort to driving around in circles. But the petrol tank is running dry... The only solution is to get out! This represents the dilemma we face in our economy and in agriculture too, according to journalist Frank Mulder. In his essay "How our means are undermining our goals: What a Hollywood movie can teach us about agriculture", he argues that we are setting ourselves up for failure by turning our agricultural system into a food production machine to maximize short term profits. The bus in the movie Speed is our global economy. Financial markets are the bomb...

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